Stephanie Looker

This paper investigates the concept of internalising disorders and the accompanying behaviour displayed in the schooling environment; looking at primary and secondary aged children with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Through sourcing literature for the study, an extensive library was available for the research of externalising disorders, but limited resources were available for the research of internalising disorders. Through personal schooling and teaching experiences in the public sector of education, some identified gaps in the literature were addressed. A key finding in this inquiry is for teachers to understand the need for awareness of student needs, and to be on the lookout for identifying factors of possible disorders that could be causing behavioural issues exhibited, rather than deeming the child as “acting out”. Further research topics will be discussed to assist teachers to better understand internalising disorders and their impacts on the classroom environment.

PLS Working Paper Series No.16

Vicente Reyes, Chris Reading, Nadya Rizk, Sue Gregory and Helen Doyle

Four distinct constructs were identified from a survey of a sample of pre-service science teachers at a regional Australian University. The constructs emerged after employing Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) on respondents’ perceptions of pedagogical practices incorporating the use of Information Communication and Technology (ICT). The key components of the survey were derived from a Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) survey developed for a national project. For future investigations of TPACK application in university contexts, a four-construct configuration of pre-service teacher TPACK perceptions is proposed that requires empirical confirmation. This inquiry depicts a portrait of the emerging domains of TPACK from our sample. The relevance of the findings of the inquiry and their implications for universities that rely heavily on ICT in the delivery of are discussed, especially in relation to improving teaching practices.

This working paper has now been published as an article in the International Journal of Information and Communication Technology Education, Vol. 12, No. 4. Details about the article can be accessed through this link:

http://www.igi-global.com/viewtitlesample.aspx?id=161781

 

Vicente Reyes, Trivina Kang and David Hogan

This article discusses initial findings from the Panel 6 Life Pathways Study of the Centre for Research in Pedagogy and Practice, National Institute of Education-Nanyang Technological University. Particular focus is aimed at measuring initial results using Mixed Model Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) of the longitudinal panel studies conducted on a stratified random sample of Secondary School students in Singapore. Three constructs are analyzed, namely: Existential Aspirations, Construction of Political Society and Political Interest. Implications on policy and practice are outlined in the article.

*This paper is based on remarks originally presented at the Asia-Pacific Educational Research Association (APERA) Conference, November 26-28-12, 2008. The original manuscript was written while the first author was an Assistant Professor at the National Institute of Education, Singapore and was presented at the APERA 2008 Conference. The first author is greatly indebted to Dr Trivina Kang and Dr David Hogan, who were the Co-Principal Investigator and Principal Investigator respectively of the Panel 6 Life Pathways Longitudinal Study.

PLS Working Papers 14

Vicente Reyes, Trivina Kang, David Hogan

This inquiry interrogates linkages between civic capital broken down into beliefs, dispositions and agency with the notion of the school as a civic community. Using data generated from a longitudinal study on a stratified random sample of two cohorts of students belonging to the primary and secondary levels of the Singapore education system, this paper attempts to establish meaningful relationships between the students’ conceptions and practices of civic capital with their perceptions of an active civic community in school.

*This paper is based on remarks originally presented at the 2nd Socio-cultural Theory in Educational Research and Practice Conference: Theory, Identity and Learning, University of Manchester, UK, 10-11 September 2007. The original manuscript was written while the first author was an Assistant Professor at the National Institute of Education, Singapore and was presented at the 2nd Socio-cultural Theory in Educational Research and Practice Conference. The first author is greatly indebted to Dr Trivina Kang and Dr David Hogan, who were the Co-Principal Investigator and Principal Investigator respectively of the Panel 6 Life Pathways Longitudinal Study.

PLS Working Paper Series 13

Vicente Reyes, Sue Gregory, Christine Reading and Helen Doyle

Three distinct clusters were identified from a survey study of a sample of 127 unit coordinators from a regional Australian University. The clusters emerged after a survey that explored perceptions of pedagogical practices that incorporated the use of Information Communication and Technology (ICT). The key components of the survey were based on seven constructs derived from the Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK). For future investigations of TPACK application in university contexts, a three-cluster configuration of teacher-practitioners is proposed that requires empirical confirmation. The relevance of the findings of the inquiry and their implications on universities that conduct ICT intensive courses were also discussed, especially in relation to improving teaching practices.

PLS Working Paper Series 12

Vicente Reyes & Charlene Tan

This article critically discusses political values in Asia with a focus on the relevance of Confucius’ philosophy to the ASEAN political security community. It begins by examining the formation of ASEAN, ‘Asian values’ and ‘ASEAN Way’. This is followed by highlighting the key characteristics, challenges and future of the ASEAN political security community in the 21st century. The next part of the inquiry focuses on one example of ‘Asian values’ – the political philosophy of Confucius. It is explained that Confucius underscores the importance of good government through the rule by virtue, and active political involvement of everyone in accordance with li (normative attitudes, values and behaviours). It is argued that Confucius’ philosophy has the potential to contribute towards the flourishing of the ASEAN political security community in two main ways. First, Confucius’ philosophy supports the ASEAN Way of Mushyawara (consultation) and Mufakat (consensus). Secondly, Confucius’ philosophy points to a possible shared political framework for the ASEAN political security that is underpinned by communitarianism.

This working paper has now been published as a book chapter in the volume entitled Norms, Interests, and Values: Conflict and Consent in the Constitutional Basic Order. Details about the book chapter can be accessed through this link:

http://www.nomos-shop.de/_assets/downloads/9783848704323_lese01.pdf

Charlene Tan & Vicente Reyes

This inquiry critically discusses the key characteristics and ideological assumptions of neo-liberal education policy, and its impact on curriculum reform in China. To illustrate the adoption and consequences of neo-liberal education policy in China, this article focuses on recent curriculum reform in Shanghai. It is argued that there is a shift, through the implementation of neo-liberal education policy, from a “one-size-fits-all” educational model to one that focuses on individual interests and needs in China. However, the neo-liberal education policy in China faces two main challenges. First, although the educational changes attempt to promote more student-centred curriculum, pedagogy and assessment, key educational stakeholders in China still value traditional forms of teaching and learning that lead to academic success in high-stakes examinations. The second challenge is the de-professionalisation of school personnel where centralised control by the state through the school appraisal system and standardised exams threatens to undermine the professionalism and autonomy of the educators.

This working paper has now been published as a book chapter in the volume entitled Spotlight on China: Changes in Education Under China’s Market Economy. Details about the book chapter can be accessed through this link:

https://www.sensepublishers.com/media/2658-spotlight-on-china.pdf

 

Johnny Go, Vicente Reyes, Chai Ching Sing

Five epistemological belief dimensions were identified from a survey study of a sample of 1068 practicing Filipino teachers from 14 primary and secondary Catholic schools. The dimensions of epistemological beliefs of this sample—identified as Authority/Expert Knowledge, Learning Effort, Learning Process, Fixed Ability, and Innate Ability—differed from previous studies that employed Chan & Elliott’s Epistemological Beliefs Questionnaire (EBQ) possibly due to differences in socio-cultural contexts. For future investigations of teacher epistemology for Philippine samples, a six factor model of epistemological belief dimensions is proposed, which suggests an additional hypothesized dimension labelled “Access to Knowledge” that requires empirical confirmation. The relevance of the study’s findings and their implications on the participating schools were also discussed, especially in relation to staff professional development programs.

PLS Working Paper Series No 9

Vicente Reyes & Catherine Chua

This qualitative research inquiry attempts to explore how school stakeholders cope with incessant and seemingly endless transformations in schools. The central phenomenon to be studied focuses on how school stakeholders “make sense” of educational. In order to do this, an exploratory case study of two target schools taking part in policy reform initiatives directed at ubiquitous use of Information Communication and Technology (ICT) in a Singapore context would be the locus of this inquiry. Using Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), interviews, and observations this inquiry investigates and builds emerging explanations to sense-making experiences of stakeholders. Policy learning narratives of actors involved in the ICT-education reforms would be analysed using the lens of Actor-Network Theory (ANT). Findings from this exploratory inquiry provide insights as to policy learning experiences of school stakeholders in periods of uncertainty.

This working paper has now been published as an article in the International Journal of Information and Communication Technology Education, Vol. 11, No. 4, pages 83-96. Details about the article can be accessed through this link:

http://www.igi-global.com/viewtitlesample.aspx?id=132788

 

Constance Chew Li Ching

The pursuit of happiness appears to be a common goal for people all over the world. However, their orientation towards happiness might be different, and this has a huge impact on whether they are happy or think they have achieved happiness. Many research have found that people who orientate their pursuit of happiness towards eudaimonia (finding meaning in life and tasks) and engagement (doing something that one enjoys greatly and driven by intrinsic motivation) are happier. Teachers’ happiness has been an area of study in happiness research, and their level of happiness has direct effect on their motivation and volition, which in turn has indirect effect on their students’ learning outcomes. Due to the cascading effects and implications to teaching and learning, threats to happiness in teaching are discussed in this article, and some suggestions are provided for further exploration.

PLS Working Paper Series No.7

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